Campus Cards, College and University Identification and Security

MidFirst Bank, Arizona State partner to replace Sun Card with MasterCard

Friday, April 13, 2012

Arizona State University, Tempe, and the state’s largest privately-held bank have partnered to implement a MasterCard student ID for students and faculty. Labeled the Pitchfork ID after the school’s nickname, the Sun Devils, the MasterCard is intended to function as a check card and student ID, enabling access to dorms, recreation centers and meal plans.

The switch to the new card, backed by MidFirst Bank, comes as ASU announced on its Web site that the Sun Dollars program designed for off campus use will soon be extinct. The new check card will take its place.


Students and faculty can still opt out of the MasterCard plan and receive a regular Sun Card that functions as an ID, carries meal plans and allows building access, but they would not be able to use Sun Cards for campus vending machines, health services or parking services. Instead, students will have to pay for those with a Pitchfork Card or other form of payment.

The check card will be directly tied to students’ free Sun Devil Checking Account with MidFirst Bank which students can begin signing up for now.

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Waukesha County Technical College has started its search for a new banking partner to fill its on-campus location.

A 2009 poll conducted at the Waukesha County Technical College found that 69% of students would use an on-campus bank. Now, the school is seeking proposals for a full-service branch on its Pewaukee campus.

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Malta’s Kunsill Studenti Universitarji is ending use of its current smart card system for financial grant delivery and payments, opting instead to transfer grant monies directly to the students’ bank accounts.

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Nigeria’s Osun State Government has launched smart identity card for all public school students within the province. The initiative began with the Salvation Army School, and stresses a commitment on the part of the government to use technology to improve planning, resource allocation and service delivery in the education sector.

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As many as 250,000 students in Jakarta may lose their academic subsidies after the Jakarta Regional Legislative Council rejected the city administration’s request for a larger budget for the Jakarta Smart Card program.

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