Campus Cards, College and University Identification and Security

Oregon college ditches lock and key for hi-tech

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Lane Community College, Eugene, Ore., is adding a key card system that will enable staff and faculty to use cards instead of keys to unlock doors and to get into specific buildings, according tot he student newspaper.

“This technology is in wide use around the world and it has many different functionalities,” said Public Safety Manager Jace Smith. “It’s going to help Lane be an active, engaged participant in the 21st century especially once we start expanding its uses.”


After Sept. 26, no staff or faculty member will be able to use metal keys on any lock on campus. The project will involve removing or changing all of the external locks.

Through the system’s software, individual cards may be coded to work during certain times for each building on campus.

Students won’t be provided key cards unless they are employed by the college.

“I think that there is a lot of promise for using this technology with students, but there has to be a commitment to the institution,” said Smith.

Read more here[end] 

Waukesha County Technical College has started its search for a new banking partner to fill its on-campus location.

A 2009 poll conducted at the Waukesha County Technical College found that 69% of students would use an on-campus bank. Now, the school is seeking proposals for a full-service branch on its Pewaukee campus.

read more »

Identification and security products manufacturer, IDenticard, is looking to rethink the way contactless is being used on college campuses with the release of UBand, a contactless access solution in the form of a wristband.

read more »

All currently enrolled Brookdale students will now receive a Brookdale OneCard. This includes visiting, fast start, dual enrollment, distance learning, early high school students and high technology high school students taking classes on the Brookdale campus.

read more »

NFC implementations on campus have been anything but perfect. In fact, between the fractured nature of NFC adoption as a technology, the relatively few university-specific NFC pilots and the rejection by Apple, NFC is far from making the grade.

read more »

Be first to comment...
Comment on this article

Your full name and URL will be displayed with your comment.

Your email is not shown or shared, and is used only for your Gravatar image.




characters left.