Campus Cards, College and University Identification and Security

UC Berkley works to fill in the gaps on its security policies

Thursday, January 28, 2010

UC Berkley had its share of security breaches in 2009. In August, hackers gained access to private student records from the Graduate School of Journalism and in May they gained access to around 160,000 students’ personal information from University Health Services, according to The Daily Californian.

Electronic information including students’ social security numbers, driver’s license numbers and medical information are now being protected with high confidentiality protection measures, such as mandatory intrusion prevention and detection software, file encryption and strengthened firewalls.


The Minimum Security Standards for Electronic Information went into effect at the beginning of the year and will be subject to annual reviews, in order to modify the systems to adapt to changing hacker techniques.

Zulfikar Ramzan, technical director for Symantec Corporation which makes Norton AntiVirus, said the campus’s new standards were generally good and covered all the basic holes that hackers could use to infiltrate the campus network.

The challenge of implementing security standards like the new campus security policy was threefold: involving the right technology, the right policies and the right level of awareness of potential security risks that could be “low-hanging fruit” for hackers, Ramzan said.

He added that UC Berkeley was particularly vulnerable to attacks because the campus is an open environment that does not prohibit access to its grounds.

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The University of Missouri has released a new set of policies for its on-campus residence halls, locking their entrances 24/7.

School officials insist that several organizations were consulted prior to rendering the new door access policies. The university’s local newspaper, the Maneater, reports that Residence Halls Association – which represents all students who live in residence halls – as well as the MU Police Department participated in the decision making process and both provided their full support for stricter door access.

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IdentiSys sales and service integrator of identification, card issuance, customer line management and access control security systems, has announced the acquisition of Cincinnati, Ohio based ID reseller Photo I.D. Systems & Supplies, Inc.

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The Hong Kong Police Force has contracted with Identive to use its smart card readers in order to comply with its new security policies. Identive will work through its Hong Kong partner AMCL to supply 12,500 readers this quarter.

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Burt Reynolds, Communications & Customer Relations Representative, Business Auxiliary Services, University of Texas at San Antonio

In my five years in the campus card industry, I have noticed that the focus has shifted more and more to two main components: technology and security. Rightfully so, as these are the key components that make up any successful identification program: some type of credential–the technology–and the objective of that credential–security.

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Examining the role of mag stripes on the modern college campus

The contemporary college campus is a bastion of new technology, serving a student population that thrives on the bleeding edge of technology. This premise holds true for campus cards as well, with the number of universities adopting advanced card technologies growing at a rapid rate.

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The Louisiana board of education is considering a near $1 million effort that will see the education department create a new identification system for public schools that doesn’t use Social Security numbers.

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